Category Archives: Children

Children Christmas Entertainment Games

To Vanish A Glasse of Beere

To celebrate Christmas, here are some entertaining party tricks from a children’s magic book published in 1634. Try these at home during the festive season, to the admiration of all.

 

[The credentials needed for a junior magician] First, he must be one of an impudent and audatious spirit, so that hee may set a good face upon the matter. Secondly, he must have a nimble and cleanly conveyance [that is, a good sleight of hand]. Thirdly, hee must have strange termes, and emphaticall words, to grace and adorne his actions, and the more to astonish the beholders. Fourthly, and lastly, such gestures of body as may leade away the spectators eyes from a strict and diligent beholding his manner of conveyance.

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Children Family Household School

Thou shalt be burned with them in Hell Fire

 

These fragments come from a 17th century book entitled A Little Book for Children and Youth.  As well as revealing details of the ubiquitous religious tyranny which children in this period were subjected to, the text also offers some lovely domestic detail about a typical day in the life of a 17th century school child.

The reason why I write these instructions for little Children is because I find by sad Experience how the Towns and Streets are filled with lewd wicked Children, and many Children as they have played about the Streets have been heard to curse and swear and call one another Nick-names, and it would grieve ones Heart to hear what bawdy and filthy Communications proceeds from the Mouths of such. And the little ones they learn of the bigger, and so soon as they go or speak they are running fast to Hell. But my dear Child, thou that hast this little book in thine hand to read, I hope thou wilt not learn of the naughty Children to swear and lye and call thy Play-fellows Nick-names, and profane the Sabbath as they do.  If thou do as they do, thou shalt be burned with them in Hell Fire, for they are the Devil’s Children.

A Child of God is one that dearly loves God and Christ. He knows that the Lord Jesus Christ so loved him that he came down and suffered Hunger and Thirst, Misery and Sorrow. Now this Child that loves Jesus has a special love for them that he think loves Christ, and if at any time he hear any discoursing of Christ, and of good things, O! how he does love to be among them, and will sit three or foure hours together a listening. He is very careful of himself that he do not Curse or Swear or Lye nor do anything that is offending to God. And if at any time he unawares tells a Lye, or speaks a naughty Word, or Plays, when the poor child thinks upon what he has done he falls a-weeping and he cannot be contented until he has been upon his knees in some corner, and there begged pardon for what he has done.

A good Child is one that loves his Book, and if his Father and Mother send him to School, then up he gets in the morning betimes, he dresses himself, and then as soon as he is drest, he goes into some corner to Prayers, and having done, he goes to his Father and Mother and makes obedience to them, and then he prays to his Mother to give him Breakfast that he may be gone, then away he hies to School and strives to be there before any of the rest of the Schollars. And those two hours at Noon, which are allowed to Schollars to play, if his School-fellows are rude and wanton, he will not go to play amongst them, but will seek about the Town or Street to find out such Children as are good and civil, and will spend the time in Discoursing  with them about God and Christ, and the matters of another World. And so will keep them company until one of the clock, that is time to go to School again. And whilst he is at School, let the other Schollars play and do what they will, this good Child will be careful to mind his Book, and learn his Lesson. And then towards Night as soon as he comes home, having made obedience to his Father and Mother, he asketh his Mother if she have anything for him to do. If she says no, then he takes his Bible and reads a chapter, and then he tell his Father and Mother what he has learn’d at School and then he goes by himself into some corner to Prayers.

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