Curiosities Death Family Love Woodcut

The London Damsel’s Fate

 

 

I just have to share this wonderful woodcut. It’s from 1670. It illustrates a ballad which laments the loss of ‘a handsome maid that was lately through the Tyranny of her Parents forced from her dearest, to one whom she hated, her Love for sorrow dyes; she being distracted through grief and envy, first drinks poyson, and then stabs her selfe’.

Here are her parents:

 

Wicked Parents

 

Books Church London

Old St Paul’s Cathedral

 

Today, some gorgeous engravings of the exterior and interior of the old St Paul’s Cathedral, which burned down during the Great Fire in 1666. The engravings come from William Dugdale’s History of St Pauls (1658), and are by Wenceslas Hollar. The building known as Old St Paul’s was the fourth church in this location, and it was begun in 1087. The church was consecrated in 1240, but work continued on St Paul’s until 1314, when it became the third-longest church in Europe. By the sixteenth century, it was falling into disrepair, and with the dissolution of the monasteries, many buildings in the churchyard were sold as commercial properties, particularly bookshops. It was here where Shakespeare would probably have bought his paper, books, and quills, and where Londoners gathered to catch up on all the latest gossip and listen to public sermons. In 1561, the spire was destroyed by lightning, and was not replaced. The outdoor pulpit known as St Paul’s Cross can be seen here. Inigo Jones added the west front to the cathedral in the 1630s.

 

From the West

 

 

From the South

 

 

From the East

 

 

From the North

 

 

Rose Window

 

 

Nave

 

 

Lady Chapel

 

 

Crypt

 

 

Chapter House and Choir

 

 

Monument to John Donne

 

Custom Dining Food Household

Take a Peacock and cover with a sheet of Lard

 

 

I recently discovered a really delightful set of texts on seventeenth century household management. I plan to write a series of posts in order to share some of the more interesting and unusual snippets. Today’s offering from 1682: how to set a posh table, fold a napkin, wow your guests with a baffling peacock dish, and prepare entertaining egg dishes.

 

Setting a posh table:

Take a basket lined with a clean Napkin. Into it set ‘a Bason and Ewer, the Essay Cup, and Cadnet, Flagons, Salts, Plates, Spoons, Forkes, Knives, Riders for Plates, Table-Cloaths, Nakins; of the which two at least folded in the fashion of a broken Staff, with bread, and all other things necessary to the Covering of a Table and side Table.’

The Butler and the Servant must take the Basket ‘thus furnished betwixt them and carry it into the Hall or Chamber where they [the household and guests] are to eat; not forgetting the Pepper-box, and Cruet of Vinegar.’

When they arrive at the chamber or hall, they must ‘set down the Basket, and so begin to cover your side-Table first, with a clean Cloath, and then set on your Plate; first, your Bason and Ewer, and your Flagons ranged against the Tapestry-Hanging, mingled one amongst the other; then underneath compose another range of Essay Cups, Sugar-Castors, and Glasses with the Feet downward, and upon each of them put a Cover.’

This done, ‘the butler begins to cover the Table thus, first the Table Cloth, then the Salts, and the Riders for Plates, then the Plates with the Coat of Arms towards the middle of the table, so many as are necessary, but let them not touch the edge of the Table by three or four fingers. At the right hand of each Plate place a Knife, with the edge towards the Plate, then the Spoons, the brim or edge of the Spoon downwards, with Forks, but be sure not to cross or lay them the one on the other, then the Bread upon the Plate, and the Napkin upon the Bread, and so much for covering a Table.’

 

The author goes on

‘It is also necessary for him [the Butler] to know how to fold, pleat, and pinch his Linnen into all manner of forms both of Fish, Beasts and Birds, as well as Fruits, which is the greatest curiosity in the covering of a Table well, for many have gone farther to see a Table neatly covered than they would have done for to have eaten a good meal at the same Table.’

 

And here are his rather complicated and unfathomable instructions on how ‘To pleat a Napkin in the form of a Cockle-shell double’:

‘Take a Napkin crossways, and fold it in the middle, and make a band of a Thumbs-breadth near the middle, continue doing this till you come within half a Foot of the Hem. Then turn your Napkin on the other side, and make the bands again in the same manner as you did the former, then take it at its length, and pinch as much and as hard as ever you can, then raise up the pleats of every band with the point of a Pin or Needle, one after another. Do this on both sides, then open the under side of your Napkin that is not pleated and fasten a Loaf in it, and gather the pleats together again upon the Loaf, then raise up your Napkin at its hight, and lay it down in the form of a Fan that is open.’

 

Carving a Thrush after the Italian fashion

 

In addition to these Martha Stewart-style tips on impressing guests and hosting, the book contains some splendid recipes. This is my favourite meat dish to date. Making a peacock look like a porcupine:

‘To make Peacocks look Porcupine; Take a Peacock and cover them with a Sheet of Lard, and so make them roast; For your sauce take Rose-water and Vinegar with small Spice, Cinamon, and Cloves, and set this under your Meat in the Dripping Pan. When the Fowl is roasted, take Cinamon in long small pieces covered over with Sugar, and stick it into your Fowl all one way, that it may seem like points of Porcupines. Then make your Sauce boyl, and put it into your dish, and lay your Fowl upon it, but let not your Sauce touch the Cinamon that is stuck into the Fowl.’

 

Finally, two truly fantastically named egg dishes. Lost Eggs, and Eggs a L’Intrigue:

‘Lost Eggs, or Perdus: Take the Yolks of raw Eggs, and steep them in a little Rose-Water with some Crums of Bread, and a little fine Wheat Flower. Beat this all together, but not strain it, and fry it in a Frying-pan with some good Butter. But forget not to put in a little Salt in the baking of it, and some Sugar over it when it is baked.’

‘Eggs a L’Intrigue: Break a dozen and a half Eggs into a Dish, and beat them well together with almost two quarts of Cream, with Pepper, Salt and sweet Herbs minced very small together. Then put some clarified Butter into a Paty-Pan, set it upon a soft Fire, and when your Butter is hot, put in about the third part of your Eggs thus beaten, and when they are about half ready, then make a Bed, or lay Cheese slices, and Anchovies in pieces, then some potch’d Eggs that are done in Water. This done, put another part of your Eggs thus beaten over all this, and cover up your Paty-pan, till these Eggs be almost baked. Then repeat the thing again and make a Bed as before, and pour over it the rest of your beaten Eggs, with some little bits of Butter and grated Cheese, then give it a colour at the top, and so serve it away hot with the juice of Lemons.’

 

Inspiring ideas for carving flashy pears
Assassination Crime Gunpowder Plot London Monarchy Parliament Tower Of London

The true copie of the declaration of Guido Fawkes

 

The confession of Guy Fawkes, published in December 1605. This confession corresponds to the official government position on the Gunpowder Plot, and was probably extracted under torture which renders it unreliable as an historical text. But it certainly makes for interesting reading.

 

The true copie of the declaration of Guido Fawkes, taken in the presence of the Counsellors whose names are under written.

I confesse that a practise in general was first broken unto me against his Majestie for relief of the Catholique cause, and not invented or propounded by my self. And this was first propounded unto me about Easter last. I was twelve month beyond the Seas in the Lowe Countryes of the Archdukes obeisance. Thomas Winter came thereupon with mee into Engand, and there we imparted our purpose to three other Gentlemen, namely, Robert Catesby, Thomas Percy, and John Wright, who all five [of us were] consulting together of the meanes how to execute the same, and taking a vow among our selves for secrecy. Catesbie propounded to have it performed with Gunpowder, and by making a Myne under the upper House of Parliament, which place we made choice of because Religion having been unjustly suppressed there, it was fittest that Justice and punishments should be executed there.

This being resolved amongst us, Thomas Percy hired a House at Westminster for that purpose, near adjoying to the Parliament House, and there we begun to make our Myne about 11th of December 1604. The five that first entered into the work were Thomas Piercy, Robert Catesby, Thomas Winter, John Wright, and my self. Soon after we took another unto us, Christopher Wright, having sworn him also, and taken the Sacrament for Secrecie. When we came to the very foundation of the Wall of the House, which was about three yards thick, and found it a matter of great difficulty, we tooke unto us another Gentleman, Robert Winter, in like manner with oath and Sacrament as aforesaid.

It was about Christmas when we brought our Myne unto the Wall, about Candlemass we had wrought the Wall halfe through. And whilst they were working, I stood as Sentinell to defer any man that came near, whereof I gave them warning, and so they ceased until I gave notice againe to proceede. And we seven lay in the House and had Shot and Powder, being resolved to die in that place before we should yeeld or be taken.

As they were working upon the Wall, they heard a rushing in a Cellar of removing of Coales, whereupon we feared we had beene discovered, and they sent me to go to the Cellar, who finding that the Coales were a-selling, and that the Cellar was to be let, viewing the commodity thereof for our own purpose, Percy went and hired the same for yeerly rent. We had this provided, and brought into the House twenty Barrels of Powder, which we remooved unto the Cellar, and covered the same with Billets and Faggots, which were provided for that purpose.

About Easter, the Parliament being prorogued until October next, we dispersed our selves, and I retired to the Lowe countries by advice and direction of the rest, as well to acquaint Owen with the particulars of the Plot, as also least by my longer stay I might have grown suspicious, and to have come into question. In the meantime Percy having the key of the Cellar, laid in more Powder and wood into it. I returned about the beginning of September next, and then receiving the key of Percy, we brought in more Powder and Billets to cover the same again, and so I went for a time into the Countrey until the 30. of October.

It was further resolved amongst us that the same day that this Act should have been performed, some other of our Confederates should have surprised the person of the Lady Elizabeth the Kings Daughter, who was kept in Warwickshire at the Lord Harington’s house, and presently have proclaimed her Queene, having a Project of Proclamation ready for that purpose; wherein we made no mention of altering of Religion, nor would have avowed the deed to be ours, untill we should have had power enough to make our partie good and then we would have avowed both. Concerning Duke Charles the Kings second son, we had sundry consultations how to seize on his person, but because we found no meanes how to compasse it, the Duke being kept near London, where wee had not forces enough, we resolved to serve our turne with the Lady Elizabeth.

The names of the principal persons that were made privy afterwards to this horrible conspiracy: Edward Digby, Knight. Francis Tresham. John Grant. Robert Keyes.

 

 

There are more posts on the Gunpowder Plot here

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